Max Patch on Film

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We got our film back from The Darkroom while I was visiting my sister and friends in Charleston. I was anxious to login to our account and see how everything turned out. Like I mentioned in last week's weekend link roundup, we tried to follow some tips from the Plant Based Traveler and a video tutorial from the 1980s demonstrating the Nikon FG manual that I found online. Based off of that video, I knew that I wanted to ease back into film by shooting in Aperture Priority mode since I didn't anticipate taking any action shots where I'd need too much creative control over the shutter speed. I also challenged myself to shoot a whole roll just on Max Patch. I wanted to isolate as many variables as possible for this roll.

I was honestly blown away at how well the photos turned out. I used Kodak 400 film and set my camera ISO to 400. We were lucky to have a fairly sunny day. I probably could have gone with the Kodak 200 but didn't want to risk getting up to Asheville and having everything underexposed due to the weather. There are a few shots that are a little blown out or grainy for that reason. In general, all my photos came out so soft and dreamy! I'm obsessed with the bokeh created in the macro shots of the vegetation. I probably used wide apertured on my 50mm lens of f/1.8 for those and f/16 or f/22 for the landscapes where the entire scene is in focus.

Do you shoot film? What artists should I check out? Have any favorite video tutorials we should watch before tackling our next rolls?